First commercial theatrical work of Korea reborn as immersive show

The National Jeongdong Theater has been at center of the establishment of public theater in Korea's modern history. Marking the 40th anniversary of the enthronement of the self-proclaimed Emperor Gojong, his Korean Empire founded Hyopyulsa, the first modern indoor theater, near Gwanghwamun, central Seoul in 1902, where they formed a group of legendary singers and musicians who performed pansori and traditional shows. After it was closed in 1906, it opened again with a new name, Wongaksa, in 1908 where Changgeuk, Korean traditional operatic performances, were presented to audiences.

First commercial theatrical work of Korea reborn as immersive show
The National Jeongdong Theater has been at center of the establishment of public theater in Korea's modern history. Marking the 40th anniversary of the enthronement of the self-proclaimed Emperor Gojong, his Korean Empire founded Hyopyulsa, the first modern indoor theater, near Gwanghwamun, central Seoul in 1902, where they formed a group of legendary singers and musicians who performed pansori and traditional shows. After it was closed in 1906, it opened again with a new name, Wongaksa, in 1908 where Changgeuk, Korean traditional operatic performances, were presented to audiences.